The Poetry of Objects

Here are the rules to the poetry game.

There are to be ten syllables each line,

And alternating lines must rhyme the same,

With fourteen rows in total.  Then combine

All the alliterations, metaphors,

That you can pack into a single phrase;

Assonance, juxtaposition, and more.

Whatever it takes, leave the reader dazed.

Trail blaze them down paths they have never seen.

Stay fresh, try not to use the same words twice.

Create imagery with vivid scenes.

And be spontaneous, throw in some dice.

And oh, the last two lines sound together,

Like thin walls and thunder in bad weather.

      The Object of Poetry

(Walter's Mission Statement)

I move the distance from pen to paper,

To escape the needs of the "little me".

I boil its vapidity to vapor,

By writing down exactly what I see.

I drum out the noise in my toxic head,

With the silencing act of pure vision.

I forget about all that has been said,

I trust in undistorted perception.

If you like how I see, give me money.

By the way, my name's Walter F. Shoutli.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • YouTube

Walter was born in 1943 to Arnold Shoutli and Louise Rattlesnatcher in San Antonio, Texas.  Arnold was of French descent, and Louise was half Comanche.  Arnold was a successful General of the Air force and was stationed in San Antonio until he was ordered by President Harry Truman to lead a squadron to South Korea.  Because of his father's career in the Air Force, Walter lived in several places throughout the world: Texas, South Korea, Taiwan, Cape Town South Africa, and finally Paris, France.  Walter attended Edgar Allen Poe Middle School in San Antonio and went through homeschooling with his mother over seas all the way through High School.  He attended one year at the Paris Sorbonne University before dropping out.  A fellow student remembers him fleeing one of the University classroom buildings, stating out loud in English, " All of these idiots that are being brain-washed!  Get them away from me!" Another student remembers him beginning to talk to people in rhyme in normal conversation.  " We all thought he had had a head injury or something, we didn't realize that he was starting a revolution in linguistics.  It goes to show, no one amounts to anything if they care what others think of them.  That's always been my problem, but it sure wasn't Walter's." 

     Walter now lives in Paris with his cat "Poe".  He writes daily and now speaks, writes and communicates entirely in rhyme in both French and English.